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Bail Yes Bonding Agencies
Serving all local, city and county jails.
State, federal and immigration bail bonds.
Call Toll Free 1-800-224-5937


For Florida bail bonds assistance 24 hours a day call toll free
1-800-224-5937

Bail Bonds & Bail Bondsmen Services

For most people, being arrested is a very troubling and embarrassing experience. You, your relatives, and your loved ones can be overwhelmed with a sense of being lost in the judicial systems legal jargon . We understand. We can help you through it. Call us toll free 24 hours a day.

Bail: Getting Out of Jail

What you need to know about bail -- what is it, how it's set, and how to pay it.

A person's first thought upon landing in jail is often how to get out -- and fast. The usual way to do this is to "post bail." Bail is cash or a cash equivalent that an arrested person gives to a court to ensure that he will appear in court when ordered to do so. If the defendant appears in court at the proper time, the court refunds the bail. But if the defendant doesn't show up, the court keeps the bail and issues a warrant for the defendant's arrest.

How Bail Is Set

Judges are responsible for setting bail. Because many people want to get out of jail immediately (instead of waiting up to three days to see a judge), most jails have standard bail schedules that specify bail amounts for common crimes this is true in and Florida. An arrested person can get out of jail quickly by paying the amount set forth in the bail schedule.

Note: in New York State bail is set only at the arraignment. As an example; If you are arrested in any of the New York Boros, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Manhattan or Long Island you will not be issued a bail until you see the judge typically 24-48 hours after being arrested. The actual posting of bail and release can take an additional 24-48 hours.

The Eighth Amendment to the U. S. Constitution requires that bail not be excessive. This means that bail should not be used to raise money for the government or to punish a person for being suspected of committing a crime. Remember: The purpose of bail is to give an arrested person his/her freedom until he/she is convicted of a crime, and the amount of bail must be no more than is reasonably necessary to insure the appearance of the defendant at all court proceedings.

If a person can't afford the amount of bail on the bail schedule, he or she can ask a judge to lower it. Depending on the state, this request must be made either in a special bail setting hearing or when the person appears in court for the first time (usually called the arraignment).

Paying Bail

Bail can take any of the following forms:

  • cash for the full amount of the bail

  • property worth the full amount of the bail (requires a court to issue an order)

  • a bail bond (a guaranteed payment of the full bail amount), or

  • a waiver of payment on the condition that the defendant appear in court at the required time (commonly called "release on one's own recognizance" ROR).

A bail bond issued by a bail bondsman is like a check held in reserve: It represents the person's promise that he or she will appear in court when required to. The bail bond is purchased by payment of a nonrefundable premium (usually about 10% of the face amount of the bond).

Getting Out of Jail Free

Sometimes people are released "on their own recognizance," or "O.R." A defendant released O.R. must simply sign a promise to show up in court. He doesn't have to post bail.

A defendant commonly requests release on his own recognizance at his first court appearance. If the judge denies the request, he then asks for low bail.

In general, defendants who are released O.R. have strong ties to a community, making them unlikely to flee. Factors that may convince a judge to grant an O.R. release include the following:

  • The defendant has family members (most likely parents, a spouse or children) living in the community.

  • The defendant has resided in the community for many years.

  • The defendant has a job.

  • The defendant has little or no past criminal record, or any previous criminal problems were minor and occurred many years earlier.

  • The defendant has been charged with previous crimes and has always appeared as required.

  • Most judges will have partially made up their mind to set or deny you bail even before you step up to the podium. This is because of what is written in your pre-trial services report. It is important then to be aware that after you are booked at the jail a court official usually a social case worker will interview you and ask you specific questions about your past criminal history, your education, your employment, citizenship status, family ties, property you own etc. This interviewers opinion is important to the judge, a negative report could all but kill any chances of you receiving bail. So be polite and answer the questions truthfully is your best bet.

For most people, being arrested is a very troubling and embarrassing experience. You, your relatives, and your loved ones can be overwhelmed with a sense of being lost in the judicial systems legal jargon . We understand. We can help you through it. Call us toll free 24 hours a day.

 

For bail bonds assistance 24 hours a day call toll free
1-800-224-5937

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